Thursday, July 28, 2011

Pola Stout, March 17, 1940

"Blends Color Harmonies Into Fine Garment Fabrics," by Virginia Pope, New York Times, March 17, 1940.

“Mrs. Stout is the wife of Rex Stout, the author. While she is spinning yarns in one wing of their hill-top farmhouse, he is spinning his yarns about Nero Wolfe in another.”

Tuesday, July 26, 2011

"Books of the Times" January 27, 1940


"Books of the Times," by Charles Poore, New York Times, January 27, 1940.

“A scene in which Archie, pretending to search for a non-existent cat, escapes over a couple of back fences, is not to be missed.”

Monday, July 25, 2011

"Over My Dead Body" Reviewed January 7, 1940

from "New Mystery Stories," by Isaac Anderson, New York Times, January 7, 1940.

“... Archie is, unless our guess is wide of the mark, the person whom readers of the Nero Wolfe stories take to their hearts. If Nero is the brains of the concern, Archie is its arms and hands and legs.”

Saturday, July 23, 2011

"Red Threads" Reviewed December 3, 1939

from "New Mystery Stories," by Isaac Anderson, New York Times, December 3, 1939.

“The longest of the lot is a full-length novel, “Red Threads,” by Rex Stout. Neither Nero Wolfe nor Tecumseh Fox appears in it, and neither will be missed.”

“You will like and respect Inspector Cramer, and you will be glad he is not on your trail if you have run afoul of the law.”

Wednesday, July 20, 2011

"Double for Death" Reviewed October 8, 1939

From “New Mystery Stories,” by Kay Irvin, New York Times, October 8, 1939.

“Introducing Tecumseh Fox. Rex Stout’s new detective is of a species quite different from Nero Wolfe. And, frankly, we miss Archie.”

Tuesday, July 19, 2011

"After Orchids With Pluck and Luck" August 27,1939


from "After Orchids With Pluck and Luck," by Edward Frank Allen, New York Times, August 27, 1939.

“Orchids may resent the characterization given them by Rex Stout in the introduction to this book about the adventures of two young men from Nutley, N.J. “An orchid,” says the creator of Nero Wolfe, the corpulent detective who got that way drinking beer, “is not a flower as a gladiolus or a poppy is a flower; it is a signal for seduction, a beckoning of the exotic, a banner of sophisticated romance.”

Monday, July 18, 2011

"The Mountain Cat" Reviewed July 30, 1939

from "New Mystery Stories," by Isaac Anderson, New York Times, July 30, 1939.

“There is no Nero Wolfe in this story, and perhaps it is just as well, for the scene is laid in Wyoming, and Nero would not be happy there, so far from his beloved orchids.”

Wednesday, July 13, 2011

"Some Buried Caesar" Reviewed February 5, 1939

from "New Mystery Stories," by Isaac Anderson, New York Times, February 5, 1939.

"Only twice since Rex Stout began to record his adventures in detection has Nero Wolfe left his home for an extended stay."

Comment: Of course, "Some Buried Caesar" is only the sixth book in the series, so at this point Wolfe has left home in 34% of his cases.

Tuesday, July 12, 2011

Kidding Cooks, December 25, 1938

from "Books & Authors," New York Times, December 25, 1938.

"Since the publication of Rex Stout's latest Nero Wolfe mystery, 'Too Many Cooks' (Farrar & Rinehart), the author has received many requests from housewives for recipes. One woman asked him how to cook a kid. Mr. Stout had to look it up, but he did so and sent her the results of his research adding: 'I am, however, better at kidding cooks than I am at cooking kids.'"

Monday, July 11, 2011

"Too Many Cooks" Reviewed August 21, 1938

from "New Mystery Stories," by Isaac Anderson, New York Times, August 21, 1938.

"You will read of rich and rare vivands such as the common man seldom or never sets tooth into, and particularly of Saucisse Minuit, for the recipe of which Nero Wolfe would gladly swap his right arm."

Sunday, July 10, 2011

Friday, July 8, 2011

"The Red Box" Reviewed April 18, 1937

from "New Mystery Stories," by Isaac Anderson, New York Times, April 18, 1937.

Monday, July 4, 2011

"The Rubber Band" Reviewed, April 19, 1936

from "New Mystery Stories" by Isaac Anderson, New York Times, April 19, 1936.

Sunday, July 3, 2011

The Mystery Trust Reports, April 17, 1936

from "Books of the Times" by Robert Van Gelder, New York Times, April 17, 1936.

Saturday, July 2, 2011

Friday, July 1, 2011

"League of Frightened Men" Review, August 18, 1935

from "New Mystery Stories" by Isaac Anderson, New York Times, August 18, 1935.